An elderly cardboard collector manages a measly $4.80 from selling his cardboard boxes to a recycling centre at the end of a long days work. Barely enough money to make ends meet, he bums a cigarette from a stranger outside a hawker centre on the way home. Hungry and exhausted as he is, he is greeted by his wife and a table of simple Singaporean comfort food: Warm porridge, stir-fried vegetables and a can of black bean dace(fish). As the couple have a honest conversation about their daily struggles, they find joy in the simplest of pleasures: sharing a “You Tiao”(dough fritter) and having half each.

Two Halves

An elderly cardboard collector manages a measly $4.80 from selling his cardboard boxes to a recycling centre at the end of a long days work.

Barely enough money to make ends meet, he bums a cigarette from a stranger outside a hawker centre on the way home.

Hungry and exhausted as he is, he is greeted by his wife and a table of simple Singaporean comfort food: Warm porridge, stir-fried vegetables and a can of black bean dace(fish).

As the couple have a honest conversation about their daily struggles, they find joy in the simplest of pleasures: sharing a “You Tiao”(dough fritter) and having half each.

“一人一半” or “Two Halves” is a short film that delves deeper into the heart of the problems in lower income, elderly families in Singapore.

Also, bringing to light the unrelenting harshness of reality: “When life comes down to the dollars and cents, it’s whether you see the glass half full or half empty.”